Two schoolfriends

Introduction

Welcome to C4EO's e-learning resource on Disability – part of our remit to gather and share local, regional and national evidence of what works to improve outcomes in services, especially for the most vulnerable children, young people and families.

The availability of accurate and comprehensive data plays an important role in helping policy makers, commissioners and practitioners to understand the needs of disabled children and young people, and the issues relating to them. This enables services to be tailored and improved to meet these needs better.

This section of the resource highlights key messages about what works to improve the wellbeing of disabled children and young people, including improving equality in outcomes and access to services. The resource provides an overview of the findings of

three knowledge reviews, looking at:
  • early years interventions
  • access to positive and inclusive activities
  • the differentiation of services to meet the needs of different groups.

The reviews identified significant gaps in the data and evidence available, highlighting, in particular, a need for further research on outcomes for disabled children and young people.

The C4EO online data resource provides you with a huge range of data from various government and non-government sources. The resource allows you to analyse this data over multiple comparators and geographies using flexible interactive tools. It also enables you to link your data analysis with robust research findings and validated local practice to find the best solutions to the provision of children's services for disabled children and young people.

We value any feedback, once you have explored and used the site. This allows us to continue to enhance the support we can give you and to expand the evidence base for effective service provision for disabled children and young people.

About C4EO

C4EO's unique remit is to 'gather and share' evidence of what works in the provision of services for children and young people. We hope that you will continue to support us by engaging in local training events, giving us feedback about our data and sharing your local examples of effective practice, to help us to continue to build the evidence base for early years work in the future.

– The authors


You can use the main navigation above to start working your way through this resource.

Disability is the second of

seven themes explored in this series of e-learning resources. Within this theme we look at the following priority areas:
  • improving the wellbeing of disabled children (up to age 8) and their families by increasing the quality and range of early years interventions
  • improving the wellbeing of disabled children and young people by improving access to positive and inclusive activities
  • ensuring all disabled children, young people and their families are receiving services that are sufficiently differentiated to meet their diverse needs.

Further reading

Beresford, B. and Clarke, S. (2010) Improving the wellbeing of disabled children and young people through improving access to positive and inclusive activities, Social Policy Research Unit, University of York.

Children Act 1989.

Department for Children, Schools and Families (2007b) Aiming high for disabled children: better support for families, London: HM Treasury.

Disability Discrimination Acts 1995 and 2005.

Newman, T. (2010) Ensuring all disabled children and young people and their families receive services which are sufficiently differentiated to meet their diverse needs.

Newman, T., McEwen, J., Mackin, H. and Slowley, M. (2010) Improving the wellbeing of disabled children (up to age 8) and their families through increasing the quality and range of early years interventions, Barnardo's Policy and Research Unit.

Definitions of disability are many and varied. The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 defines disability as 'a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on a person's ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities'. The Children Act 1989 defines a disabled person as someone who is 'blind, deaf or dumb or suffers from mental disorder of any kind, or is substantially and permanently handicapped by illness, injury or congenital or other such disability as may be prescribed'.

These are: be healthy; stay safe; enjoy and achieve; make a positive contribution; and achieve economic wellbeing.

Previously the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF).

Where not attributed to a specific study, the findings reported in this resource come from the knowledge reviews themselves, based on the synthesis of all studies reviewed.

Knowledge review 1 (KR1): Newman et al 2010.

Knowledge review 2 (KR2): Beresford and Clarke 2010.

Knowledge review 3 (KR3): Newman 2010.

The C4EO themes are: Early Years; Disability; Vulnerable children, Child poverty; Safeguarding; Families, Parents and carers; Schools and communities.